Make Your Own Lace Pottery

The art of pottery is not easy to master and this is why the product result can look pretty fascinating. Maggie Weldon, who has her own pottery studio in North Karolina, makes the most beautiful lace-patterned pottery ever! In order to create her art pieces, she uses clay and left-over pieces of lace which help her transfer beautiful patterns onto ceramics. These pieces will then be used as plates or decor items and have the most delicate pastel colors. Maggie works closely with the organization called Count me in which supports female entrepreneurs. You can learn from the link below how to make your own lace-patterned pottery at home step-by-step. Besides the clay, you are going to need a rolling pin that you will use to press the doily into the clay and a wet sponge to make the pattern more smooth. With the help of a pottery knife, cut the edges of the transfered doily and give your pottery a unique design. For more detailsabout each step, please visit the link below . This Lace Pottery can be a great GIFT.

1.Using a rolling pin, roll out a slab of porcelain clay 1/4 inch thick, making sure the slab is about 4 inches larger than the size of the doily to be used. Place the slab on a piece of cotton fabric.

2.Using a rolling pin, press the doily into the clay to make an impression.

3. Gently and slowly, peel back the doily.
4. Using a wet sponge, clean and smooth the lace impression, making sure to wipe away any loose particles of clay.

5. Using a pottery knife, trim around the outside edges of the doily design, smoothing any rough edges with your fingers or a wet sponge.

6. Grip the edges of the underlying fabric, and slide the clay into a shallow bowl so that the sides of the piece are slightly raised. Carefully press the clay down into the bowl, and let it dry for approximately 2 days (this varies greatly depending upon the humidity of the environment and the dampness of the clay.)

Maggie Weldon is the owner of MaggiesCrochet and have over 600 crochet patterns. Find her work


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